Melissa Brock

Melissa Brock

Writer & Blogger

My name is Melissa and I’m a longtime admission professional, personal finance writer, editor  and parent of two (very!) busy kiddos. I couldn’t make it all happen without my husband, Steve.

I hatched my site because I’ve heard so many head-scratching questions from parents. I’ve journeyed in the footsteps of hundreds of families, trekked to dozens of college fairs and even weighed the (billions?) of college savings options for my own two kiddos.

What I Wish I’d Written to My Mom Before the College Search

by | Aug 12, 2020 | Build relationships | 0 comments

Hello! Here’s a guest post from my friend and colleague, Henry Khederian, who’s also a recent University of Michigan grad. He wrote a post-graduate letter about what he wishes he would have talked to his mom about during the college application process. Henry is a data research content creator at Benzinga. Enjoy!

Dear Mom, 

You’ve guided and supported me through some of the most difficult and challenging decisions in my life. 

Whether it was helping me select the best and brightest colors to finger paint when I was 5 or helping me look my best for my last high school prom, I know I can always count on your input! 

I’ve had my ups and downs in high school, and you know that better than anyone. When I didn’t make the varsity basketball team, you were there to tell me life goes on and things happen for a reason.

When I went out on my first ice cream date, you did the little things like help me pick out a 10/10 outfit and let me borrow your car.

College is just around the corner, and like a member of Congress needs the counsel of his aids, I want to tackle this thing they call college admissions together. 

I Want Your Help — I Really Do!

I’ve heard this thought bounced around on college admissions forums — the only thing harder than a student selecting a school is the parents’ role in steering their child in the right direction.

In other words, this process will not be one of linear progression (thanks, Algebra II, for the lingo). As decisions come in from the universities I apply to, I will face the heartbreak of rejection and the elation of success on this path. 

When I falter, I’m not asking you to hold my hand per se, but provide a way forward if my favorite school doesn’t pan out the way I dreamed it would. After all, you will feel my impending acceptances, waitlists and rejection decisions at an emotional magnitude greater than or equal to me, that’s for sure.

It’s my responsibility to write the arduous college essays, recount my high school extracurricular activities and gather transcripts. But more than ever, I could use your wisdom to help me keep my ducks in a row during an incredibly stressful process. 

Will you join me on this journey?

I’ve assembled a short list of the ways I believe you can support my success in the college admissions process. 

In other words, here’s what I believe I need from you. (This is by no means an exhaustive list, and there’s no question that we could argue points made here, but this is what’s at the forefront of what I need from you as a high school student.)

Read Between the Lines

The ever-daunting question many high school students like me face is how should I handle the college admissions essay process?

Am I left to toss and turn at night, perplexed in the uncertainty that what I’ve written may not be good enough for an esteemed Ivy League admissions board?  

Because so many college essays ask you to tell your personal story and journey, who better than to help me map my life experiences up to this point than you, Mom? 

Help Me Identify My Strengths and Weaknesses

The concept of blind spots does not only apply to learning how to drive, you know! It can be hard to recall each one of my strengths and weaknesses these past 4 years. Where did I shine in my schoolwork, where did I lack support from my community in the midst of stressors from school? 

Here are 3 key examples of questions where the common app asks me to recall my biggest of strengths and weaknesses:

  1. Some students have a background, identity, interest or talent so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, please share your story.
  2. The lessons we take from obstacles we encounter can be fundamental to later success. Recount a time when you faced a challenge, setback or failure. How did it affect you and what did you learn from the experience?
  3. Reflect on a time when you questioned or challenged a belief or idea. What prompted your thinking? What was the outcome?

Absent the need to submit SAT and ACT test scores, essays are more important than ever. 

I’m a firm believer that blind spots can only be spotted by the people closest to you. Why else would they be called blind spots if you could determine what they are all on your own? 

I need your help with that college application checklist, even if it seems like I don’t appreciate your input. 

Give Me Feedback

We’ve sat down together and hashed out so many incredibly active discussions on our life views (and yes, we’ve had arguments). I promise I won’t be mad if you have some critical feedback after I write the first few drafts for my common app essays. 

Because I know your feedback can shine a light on my blind spots and is the most golden of all.

In other words, it’s one thing if I visited a hurricane-relief zone for charity work, but why did I decide to take on this role? What are the lasting effects of helping others in need? Anyone can tell their story, but it’s you, Mom, who can best build depth and breadth to the experiences I’ve had. You know me best!

Know that this Year is Stressful

My high school graduating class is facing stress before classes even begin. Due to coronavirus, the end of my “in-person” high school career may be cut short. 

If anything, this uncertain timeline for the upcoming school year makes me want to make the most of each day that you and I have together before college arrives.

Because I’m bound to struggle with the logistical learning challenges brought on by COVID-19, I want you to be the first to know that, because you’ve been there for me time and time again, I trust you more than anyone to guide me through the finish line!

Some things never change — like how much I appreciate your support and critical feedback when I need it most. 

Thank you for everything, and I know we’ve got this!

Love,

Your Son

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  1. 5 Myths About the College Search — Busted! — Right Before School Starts - MoonPrep - […] News flash: Your mom’s not in charge of your college search. Sure, searching for college may be the most…

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